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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Nietzsche: a self-portrait from his letters. found in the catalog.

Nietzsche: a self-portrait from his letters.

Friedrich Nietzsche

Nietzsche: a self-portrait from his letters.

Edited and translated by Peter Fuss and Henry Shapiro.

by Friedrich Nietzsche

  • 267 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, -- 1844-1900

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 185-190.

    ContributionsFuss, Peter Lawrence, 1932- ed., Shapiro, Henry L., ed.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 196 p. ports. ;
    Number of Pages196
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18908282M

    Friedrich Nietzsche has books on Goodreads with ratings. Friedrich Nietzsche’s most popular book is Selections (Great Philosophers). Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from His Letters by. Friedrich Nietzsche, Peter Fuss (translator), Henry Shapiro (translator). Nietzsche kept an interest for the philosopher: among his books was Mainländer, a new Messiah, written by Max Seiling, published a decade later. Nietzsche read in Paul Bourget's Essais de psychologie contemporaine, from which he borrowed the French term décadence. Bourget had an organicist conception of society.

    Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son: A Book of Father Son Advice a $ Letters from a. Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son (Paperback or Softback) Letters from a self-made merchant to his son: Being the letters written by Joh.. $ Letters from a. Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son by Horace George. In a letter of 18 December to Carl Fuchs, he notes that “Everything is completed!” and that, “Since the old God has abdicated, I shall rule from now on” (Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from His Letters, ). By this time he was signing his letters “Phoenix,” “the Monster,” and “Nietzsche Caesar.”.

      (Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from His Letters, ) The Antichrist is not intended for the timid or the faint of heart. It seethes with contempt for what Nietzsche regards as mankind’s greatest crime—Christianity’s imposition, upon humanity, of its perverse and unnatural s: 3.   The Madness Letters: Friedrich Nietzsche and Béla Tarr Friedrich Nietzsche, photographed in mid, after a mental breakdown and two strokes. This image is a part of the series "The Ill Nietzsche" photographed by Hans Olde.


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Nietzsche: a self-portrait from his letters by Friedrich Nietzsche Download PDF EPUB FB2

Friedrich Nietzsche engaged in very rich correspondence over many years of his life, and given just how personal philosophy was for him, his letters can often lead his readers to important details that can augment our efforts in coming to understand him.

Make no mistake, there are no substitutes for his published works, books which he took the greatest pains to prepare, but the letters can and /5. Genre/Form: Correspondence Personal correspondence Biographies: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, Nietzsche: a self-portrait from his letters.

A Self-Portrait from His Letters The Letters. A Chronological Sketch. Nietzsche’s Major Works, with Dates of First Publication. Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, Audience.

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Citation Information. Nietzsche. A Self-Portrait from His Letters. Edited by Fuss, Peter / Shapiro, Henry. Harvard University Press. Pages: i–vi. Here is a portrait of Nietzsche ’s life drawn by Nietzsche himself.

His letters, often unappreciated in English because of the stilted teutonized manner in which they have been translated, are here presented in a fluent American idiom that retains the flavor of the original idiomatic German. The trickiest of all Nietzsche’s women was his younger sister, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche.

Having returned to Germany in after a failed attempt to. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "Selected letters of Friedrich Nietzsche".

Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait From His Letters. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche () Abstract This article has no associated abstract. Nietzsche's Self-Interpreting Perspective on Life and Humanity. Add more citations Similar books and articles. Analytics. Added to PP index Total views 0 Recent downloads (6 months) 0 How can I.

Telling, for instance, is a conversation, inabout a self-portrait of Hans Holbein’s, of which Nietzsche said it displayed “lips made for kissing”—an observation that may not jump to a straight man’s mind.

Less telling, for instance, is the episode of Nietzsche asking his student von Scheffler to join him for a vacation.

Dx'r~ Temple University Nietzsche:4 Self-Portrait from his Letters. Edited and translated by Peter Fuss and Henry Shapiro. (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Pp. viii+ $) As the translator-editors put it in the opening sentence of their Preface: "This book tells the story of Nietzsche's life, and the narrator is.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

I had no idea Nietzsche could be funny until I read his letters. “The gentlest, most reasonable man may, if he wears a large moustache, sit as it were in its shade and feel safe,” he wrote.

Nietzsche Hardcover – February 5, by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Author), Peter Fuss (Editor), Henry Shapiro (Editor) & 0 moreAuthor: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from His Letters Friedrich Nietzsche.

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A Self-Portrait from His Letters Edited by: Peter Fuss and Henry Shapiro. Translated by: Peter Fuss and Henry Shapiro. Publisher: Harvard University Press The Letters. A Chronological Sketch Nietzsche’s Major Works, with Dates of First Publication.

The Correspondents. Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month 16 results for Books: Peter Fuss. Skip to main search results Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from His Letters.

by Friedrich Nietzsche, Peter Fuss, et al. | Jan 1, out of 5 stars 1. Hardcover. My Sister and I is an apocryphal work attributed to the German philosopher Friedrich ing the Nietzsche scholar Walter Kaufmann, most consider the work to be a literary forgery, although a small minority argues for the book's authenticity.

It was supposedly written in or early during Nietzsche's stay in a mental asylum in the Thuringian city of Jena. At the beginning of JanuaryNietzsche sent letters to friends that exhibited symptoms of a mental collapse.

After Overbeck received such a letter, he travelled to Turin the same day to retrieve the sick Nietzsche and his manuscripts. He continued to visit Nietzsche until the latter's death in SPL — Nietzsche: A Self-Portrait from his Letters SL — Selected Letters of Friedrich Nietzsche UWO — Unpublished Writings from the Period of Unfashionable Observations TI — Twilight of the Idols UM — Untimely Meditations WS — The Wanderer and His Shadow WTP — The Will to Power Z — Thus Spoke Zarathustra Notes: 1.

Turin, ca. January 4, Letter to Umberto I, King of Italy. To my beloved son Umberto. My peace be with you! Tuesday I shall be in Rome. I should like to see you, along with His Holiness the Pope.

The Crucified. Turin, ca. January 4, Letter to Cardinal Mariani, Vatican Secretary of State. My beloved son Mariani. [Mariano Rampolla.]. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought.

In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future.The majority of this source is interpretation of Thus Spake Zarathustra, The Antichrist, Daybreak, The Genealogy of Morals, and other books, letters, and essays written by Nietzsche, which have run contrary to the work of his anti-Semitic counterpart, Wagner, and his sister Elisabeth.

In addition, chapter is dedicated to Nietzsche's critique of.